Accessible Cambridge
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Accessible Cambridge

These Cambridge attractions, hotels and eateries offer good facilities for those with additional needs.

Punting

Nobody should miss out on Cambridge’s most iconic attraction, and the city’s punting firms endeavour to make the experience as accessible as possible for all ages and levels of mobility. Scholars Punting, located on Quayside, is handily located a few hundred metres from Parkside car park, with public toilets situated right next to the checking-in desk. You can’t take a mobility scooter or wheelchair on the punt, but the team will store it during your trip and bring it you when you dock. Deaf customers can download a PDF of the tour guide’s script, and hard of hearing customers are advised to position themselves close to the guide.

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Cambridge Arts Theatre

If you’re keen to enjoy a show in Cambridge, the Arts Theatre has an eclectic programme of productions year-round. There are parking spaces for customers with disabilities in four locations near the theatre (Peas Hill, Wheeler Street, King’s Parade and in the Grand Arcade car park), and the front of house team will book your taxi home if requested. The theatre offers reduced price tickets for customers with additional needs (and free personal assistant tickets) and both entrances have level access doors which can be activated by a push button. There are eight spaces for wheelchair users in the stalls, and while mobility scooters cannot be accommodated in the theatre, a number of wheelchairs are available to borrow (including one electric wheelchair). The theatre also offers a variety of assisted performances, including BSL interpreted, captioned performances and audio described performances.

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The Gonville Hotel

This Cambridge hotel offers a handful of well-appointed, fully accessible bedrooms. Located on the ground floor, the design has been subtly adapted for ease of use and movement, and features include handrails and a wet room. The restaurant and bar are also located on the ground floor, and there’s ample parking right outside. Another nice service The Gonville offers is a tour of the city in a vintage Bentley, of which the hotel has two.

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The Ivy Cambridge Brasserie

One of Cambridge’s smartest restaurants, The Ivy is a great spot for brunch, lunch, dinner, afternoon tea or cocktails. There are a couple of steps outside the restaurant’s main entrance, but there’s an accessible entrance to the side (notify the staff of your requirements when booking or on arrival and they can guide you), or alternatively there is a Max Aviation stair climber to allow access at the main doors if guests wish to use it. There is a large accessible toilet on the dining room floor, and you can request to be seated close to this if required.

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Cambridge Junction

The staff advise getting in touch before visiting to ensure your experience is as easy and convenient as possible, but as standard can offer dedicated disabled parking, a viewing platform for wheelchair users (J2 only), and free tickets for companions. Accessible toilets are in all of the Junction’s venues.

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The Fitzwilliam Museum

The museum has created a visual story which takes you through exactly what you will encounter on a visit, as well as working with AccessAble to create a comprehensive overview of facilities. You can access the museum at street level, and there are lifts available to other floors for those with mobility issues. There are accessible toilets on the ground floor, and a fleet of wheelchairs available at the courtyard entrance (bookable when you book your ticket). The museum also offers verbal description and touch tours, combining the opportunity to touch selected objects with a visual explanation.

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More information

For more information on accessibility in Cambridge please visit: https://www.accesscambridge.co.uk

Accessible Cambridge provides disability access information for leisure and entertainment facilities in Cambridge and the surrounding area. It is aimed at anyone with reduced mobility, visual impairment, hearing impairment, elderly bones, or any other access need.

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Did you know?

Bringing the river to life in raucous style each June, ‘The Bumps’ are a chaotic series of rowing races. In this Cambridge tradition, which dates back to the early 19th Century, boats set out in single file and must catch and touch, or ‘bump’, the boat ahead without being caught by the rowers on their tail.